Electives

It is strongly suggested that students take electives in social studies for a full & comprehensive experience.

AP European History

Grade 12

PREREQUISITES: Students must complete 9th grade World History, U.S. History 1, and U.S. History 2 prior to entry. Admission is by application.

This full-year course follows the Advanced Placement curriculum from the Renaissance to the present in Europe and builds upon the World History curriculum. Students taking this course should demonstrate a high level of ability and a deep interest in history. Students should expect to devote considerable time to outside reading requirements and be able to participate actively in class discussions. ​

This course will require a summer assignment. All students enrolled in an AP class are required to prepare for and take the AP exam in May.

AP macroeconomics

Grades 11 & 12

PREREQUISITES: Students must complete 9th grade World History, U.S. History 1, and successfully complete Algebra II/Trigonometry prior to entry.

This one-semester AP Macroeconomics course explores the economic system as a whole. Students develop a thorough understanding of key economic concepts including national income and price-level determination, measures of economic performance, the financial sector, stabilization policies, economic growth, and international economics. As the class reflects the sophistication of a college-level course, students should expect to devote considerable time to outside readings/assignments. ​

This course will require a summer assignment. All students enrolled in an AP class are required to prepare for and take the AP exam in May.

AP US government & politics

Grades 11 & 12

PREREQUISITES: Students must complete World History and United States History 1 prior to entry. Admission to this course is by application.

This one-semester course will give students an analytical perspective on government and politics in the United States. It includes the study of the constitutional underpinnings used to interpret American politics with an analysis of specific examples. Students will investigate how political beliefs, political parties, interest groups, mass media, and the institutions of the national government shape their political process. ​

This course will require a summer assignment. All students enrolled in an AP class are required to prepare for and take the AP exam in May.

AP World History

Grade 12

PREREQUISITES: Students must complete 9th grade World History, U.S. History 1, and U.S. History 2 prior to entry. Admission is by application.

This full-year course follows the AP curriculum and will examine the evolution of cross-cultural global contacts and analyze the way in which the world’s major civilizations have interacted since 8,000 B.C.E. The program is built around five overarching themes which emphasize elements such as the interaction between humans and the environment, the interaction of cultures, state-building, competing economic systems and the transformation of social structures. These themes provide a framework to make comparisons over time and across cultures. Students should expect to devote considerable time to outside reading in both texts and supplemental primary and secondary sources. ​

This course will require a summer assignment. All students enrolled in an AP class are required to prepare for and take the AP exam in May.

European History

1914-Present Grade 11 & 12

This one-semester course examines the major trends in European politics, economics, and social/cultural history from 1914 to the present. The program will build upon the understandings gained in the 9th grade World History curriculum. It will also provide students with an opportunity to pursue interests in the study of 20th century Europe, as well as contemporary events shaping the continent (i.e. Brexit, immigration, etc.).

Film and History in Society

Grades 11 & 12

List of Films

This one-semester course will examine the relationship between motion pictures and history. The class will study films that have influenced society and films that depict historical events. Students will examine how films reflect the social and political environment of the time in which they are produced. Students will research the use and role of film in history as well as the accuracy/inaccuracy of historical films.

Money, Markets & Investing

Grades 10, 11 & 12

This one-semester course is designed to introduce students to career opportunities and money management. Recognizing and developing one’s skills and finding suitable professional opportunities will be examined, before introducing the basics of money management and investing. Students will participate in a trading/investing simulation as part of the learning experience to understand further how financial markets work. This course fulfills the financial literacy graduation requirement.

US in INternational Affairs

Grades 11 & 12

PREREQUISITES: Students must complete at least one year of United States History

Global interactions and the role of the United States as a member of the international community are the focus of this course. Students investigate topics such as world population and development, human rights, environmental concerns, international trade, American foreign policy, and security threats including nuclear proliferation and terrorism. Students are exposed to the world and varying points of view on global issues through a variety of different international sources including print, film/video, websites etc. Students examine select regional case studies to develop their understanding of regional and global conflicts. Considerable time is spent making sense of current world conflicts, challenges, and events.

Holocaust & Genocide studies

Grades 10, 11 & 12

Those students who have completed World History and at least one year of U.S. History may take this one semester class as an elective. The class is designed to offer students an opportunity to explore and evaluate the history and motivations for some of the darkest moments of the 20th/21st centuries. Starting with the Holocaust, factors that foster and enable genocides to occur will be examined. Major events and concepts include a history of anti-semitism, Jewish life before the Holocaust, Hitler's rise to power, Jews in Germany and Europe, World War II, Poland and the death camps, the Final Solution, resistance and rescue, the U.S.'s response, liberation, and the Nuremberg Trials. The course will then investigate other select examples of genocide using relevant concepts and terms from the Holocaust case study (i.e. Armenia, Rwanda, Cambodia, Bosnia, and Sudan). This course seeks to uncover the various themes and patterns of genocides, honor those who have been lost in ethnic conflict, and remember their history and legacy in order to prevent this pattern from occurring again.

Law

Grades 11 & 12

This one-semester course is designed for those students interested in an introduction to the law and its role in today's society. Students examine the individual's relationship with government. Selected court decisions are analyzed, and legal rights and obligations are emphasized in a practical way. While the focus is on the American legal system, global examples and connections are incorporated into the instruction. The course will also assist students in developing their ability to defend both sides of a legal question, orally and in writing.

Sociology

Grades 11 & 12

This one-semester course is designed to expose the students to the basic principles and concepts of group behavior. Students will focus on culture, socialization, social change, group dynamics and social institutions using local, national and global examples. Equipped with an understanding of these principles and concepts, the student will explore contemporary social problems.

Big History

Grades 10, 11 & 12 (Not running 2020-2021; new for 2021-2022)

Where did everything come from? How did we get to where we are now? Where do humans fit in? Where are things heading? These are timeless questions humans have addressed for thousands of years. Big History attempts to answer them by examining the entire past of the Universe using the best available ideas from disciplines such as history, philosophy, literature, astronomy, chemistry and biology. Throughout the course, you'll explore different scales of time and space and view human history from new angles. You'll learn what we know and what we don't, consider our place in the Universe, and develop your own ideas for what the future may hold.